Why is updating the curriculum important

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Something like this: They were taught that there was nothing stopping them from getting to that lush, green lawn of a career, but that they’d need to put in years of hard work to make it happen.

After graduating from being insufferable hippies, Lucy’s parents embarked on their careers.

This makes it even more essential that all staff members use a common terminology and common strategies to provide feedback.

To raise high school graduation and college completion rates, close achievement gaps, and help students succeed in college and careers, it takes collaboration and support.

She’s also part of a yuppie culture that makes up a large portion of Gen Y.

I have a term for yuppies in the Gen Y age group—I call them Gen Y Protagonists & Special Yuppies, or GYPSYs.

The same Ngram viewer shows that the phrase “a secure career” has gone out of style, just as the phrase “a fulfilling career” has gotten hot.

To be clear, GYPSYs want economic prosperity just like their parents did—they just also want to be fulfilled by their career in a way their parents didn’t think about as much. While the career goals of Gen Y as a whole have become much more particular and ambitious, Lucy has been given a second message throughout her childhood as well: This would probably be a good time to bring in our second fact about GYPSYs: “Sure,” Lucy has been taught, “everyone will go and get themselves some fulfilling career, but I am unusually wonderful and as such, my career and life path will stand out amongst the crowd.” So on top of the generation as a whole having the bold goal of a flowery career lawn, each individual GYPSY thinks that he or she is destined for something even better— A shiny unicorn on top of the flowery lawn. Because this is what all GYPSYs think, which defies the definition of special: spe-cial| ‘spe SHel | adjective better, greater, or otherwise different from what is usual.

They were raised by Lucy’s grandparents, members of the G. Generation, or “the Greatest Generation,” who grew up during the Great Depression and fought in World War II, and were most definitely not GYPSYs.This left GYPSYs feeling tremendously hopeful about their careers, to the point where their parents’ goals of a green lawn of secure prosperity didn’t really do it for them. This leads to our first fact about GYPSYs: The GYPSY needs a lot more from a career than a nice green lawn of prosperity and security.The fact is, a green lawn isn’t quite exceptional or unique enough for a GYPSY.They often feel entitled to a level of respect and rewards that aren’t in line with their actual ability and effort levels, and so they might not get the level of respect and rewards they are expecting.” For those hiring members of Gen Y, Harvey suggests asking the interview question, “Do you feel you are generally superior to your coworkers/classmates/etc., and if so, why?” He says that “if the candidate answers yes to the first part but struggles with the ‘why,’ there may be an entitlement issue.

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